Carryover Effects of Self-Control on Decision Making: A Construal-Level Perspective

Carryover Effects of Self-Control on Decision Making: A Construal-Level Perspective

Six experiments examine how exerting self-control systematically influences subsequent decision making. Exerting self-control led individuals to rely on feasibility over desirability attributes, favor secondary over primary attributes, and choose products framed in a proximal rather than distal perspective. Process measures suggest that these effects occur because depletion from self-control heightens one’s focus on resources and prompts a lower construal level that is carried over to subsequent tasks. Stimulating individuals to adopt higher level construals diminishes these effects. These findings offer insight into the psychological process by which self-control influences subsequent decisions.

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APA-Format Citation

Wan, E. W., & Agrawal, N. (2011). Carryover effects of self-control on decision making: A construal-level perspective. Journal of Consumer Research, 38(1), 199-214.

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